Health Care Sham: “Is This The Best We Can Do?”

October 29, 2009

Headlined as “History In The Making” and “Historic: House Releases Health Care Bill,” Ryan Grim promoted a tone of celebration – as if we should be overlooking facts/fates – and rejoicing: “The ceremony . . . marks the greatest progress toward the Democratic Party’s top domestic priority goal in more than half a century.”  How much more insult are we to endure – even from our (supposedly) progressive (and objective) press/media?  As written previously, we went “from Single-Payer to a Public Option to a fragmented Option (‘Opt-Out’) to a ‘Trigger’” (still not enough for the likes of Sen. “Money Talks” Lieberman).  Once the final combined bills are stripped further – in order to placate a minority –  there will be nothing “robust” left of what the (True) majority wished, fought, and voted for.  Under the guise of needing 60 votes (with spines, 51 votes would have sufficed), we have been “bamboozled.”  (Remember Obama using that term last year?)  This constant watering-down has already set us up for realizing “the cost of health care” as  “increasing” – in direct opposition to what would have resulted from a Single-Payer focus.  Consequently, the “Affordable” reference in the “Health Care for America Act” is just as Orwellian as the “Freedom” in McCain’s “Internet Act.”  Does this sham of “reform,” which mainly just mandates us into private insurers’ hands, really equal “the greatest progress” that could have been made?  No.  But, the answer as to why is explicit in another HuffPost title from today: “Big Pharma Ready For ‘Hand To Hand Combat’ To Defend White House Deal.”

Congressman Kucinich: Is This the Best We Can Do?

“Is this the best we can do?  Forcing people to buy private health    insurance, guaranteeing at least $50 billion in new business for the insurance companies?

“Is this the best we can do?  Government negotiates rates which will drive up insurance costs, but the government won’t negotiate with the pharmaceutical companies which will drive up pharmaceutical costs.

“Is this the best we can do?  Only 3% of Americans will go to a new public plan, while currently 33% of Americans are either uninsured or underinsured?

“Is this the best we can do?  Eliminating the state single payer option, while forcing most people to buy private insurance.

“If this is the best we can do, then our best isn’t good enough and we have to ask some hard questions about our political system: such as Health Care or Insurance Care?  Government of the people or a government of the corporations.”

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